Meaningful Learning

Learning much without a vision of what we want to do in life is fruitless. The mind will roam from one thing to the next because it is searching for satisfaction– that satisfaction that happens when contentment for attaining a goal is met.  A fruitless mind reminds me of the term tabular rasa which refers to having no knowledge of anything unless you experience something about it. I look at this too as a wondering mind that is in limbo when experiences are not stored in it.

Think about a baby.  How does a baby learn? Isn’t it the environment that develops the mind and thoughts of a baby whose mind at birth is blank? Once the baby experiences things, knowledge begins to form. Would the baby think and do good or bad things? It is all up to you.

So in order to benefit from learning, a goal must be in mind; also practical application is necessary. Practice what you learn. Without applying what is learned, idleness sets in and things are pushed back in the mind.  In other words, they might be forgotten and what was learned would become meaningless.  This applies to all of life experiences.  It could be love, career, writing, homemaking, painting, and etcetera. Remember, a mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Another side of this is that you would only want to practice good things.  Who wants to do bad things, right? We see, hear, and learn good and bad things.  The bad things need to be forgotten.  So we must think positively when applying what we have learned.  Not everything in our experience is good.  Our parents and society determines what are good morals that we should practice and we are guided by such to make our learning meaningful.